JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32895
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Miyatake, Nobuyuki| Saito, Takeshi| Wada, Jun| Nishikawa, Hidetaka| Matsumoto, Sumiko| Miyachi, Motohiko| Fujii, Masafumi| Makino, Hirofumi| Numata, Takeyuki|
Abstract <p>We evaluated the linkage between oxygen uptake at the ventilatory threshold (VT) and muscle strength in subjects with and without metabolic syndrome. We used data of 226 Japanese men with metabolic syndrome and 265 Japanese men without the syndrome. Metabolic syndrome has recently been defined by a new criterion in Japan. Oxygen uptake at VT and muscle strength, i.e. grip strength and leg strength were measured. Oxygen uptake at VT and muscle strength/body weight were found to be significantly lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome than in those without the syndrome. However, the differences did not reach significant levels after adjusting for leg strength/body weight or oxygen uptake at VT. A combination of aerobic exercise and resistance training might be considered for preventing and improving metabolic syndrome.</p>
Keywords metabolic syndrome oxygen uptake ventilatory threshold muscle strength
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2007-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume61
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 255
End Page 259
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 17971842
Web of Sience KeyUT 000250431700003
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32883
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Miyatake, Nobuyuki| Wada, Jun| Saito, Takeshi| Nishikawa, Hidetaka| Matsumoto, Sumiko| Miyachi, Motohiro| Makino, Hirofumi| Numata, Takeyuki|
Abstract <p>We compared muscle strength between Japanese men with and without metabolic syndrome. We used data for 323 Japanese men with metabolic syndrome and 893 Japanese men without the syndrome. Metabolic syndrome was defined by a new criterion in Japan, and the parameters for muscle strength, i.e. grip strength, leg strength were measured. Leg strength was found to be significantly higher in subjects with metabolic syndrome than in those without, while muscle strength per body weight was significantly lower in subjects with the syndrome. Lower muscle strength per body weight may be one of the characteristic features in subjects with metabolic syndrome.</p>
Keywords metabolic syndrome grip strength leg strength
Amo Type Short Communication
Published Date 2007-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume61
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 89
End Page 102
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 17471310
Web of Sience KeyUT 000245875600007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31851
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Miyatake, Nobuyuki| Saito, Takeshi| Miyachi, Motohiko| Tabata, Izumi| Numata, Takeyuki|
Abstract <p>The aim of this study was to explore muscle strength and its relation to exercise habits in Japanese. We used data from 3,018 men and 6,881 women aged 20-69 years and not using medications in a cross-sectional study. Exercise habits and muscle strength, i.e. grip strength and leg strength, were measured. Age-related changes in muscle strength were noted. Exercise habits were found in 984 men (32.6%) and 1,664 women (24.2%). For subjects of both sexes over 50 years, grip strength was significantly decreased with age. However, the ratio of leg strength to body weight significantly decreased with age as early as 30 years in men and 40 years in women. Grip strength, leg strength and the ratio of leg strength to body weight in subjects with exercise habits were significantly higher than those without exercise habits after adjusting for age in both sexes. This standard mean value may provide a useful database for evaluating muscle strength in Japanese adult subjects.</p>
Keywords exercise habits grip strength leg strength
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2009-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume63
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 151
End Page 155
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 19571902
Web of Sience KeyUT 000267388200005