Acta Medica Okayama volume74 issue6
2020-12 発行

Antenatal Care Visits and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes at a Hospital in Rural Western Province, Rwanda

Calliope, Simba Akintije Department of International Health and Medical Anthropology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University
Yorifuji, Takashi Department of Epidemiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Wada, Takayuki Graduate School of Human Life Science, Osaka City University
Mukakarake, Marie Goret Mibilizi District Hospital
Mutesa, Leon Center for Human Genetics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda
Yamamoto, Taro Department of International Health and Medical Anthropology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University
Publication Date
2020-12
Abstract
In many economically developing countries, and especially in the rural regions of sub-Saharan African coun-tries, there have been only limited investigations into the association between antenatal care (ANC) and adverse pregnancy outcomes. We obtained information on ANC and pregnancy outcomes between 2011 and 2016 from hospital files of pregnant women (n = 4,960) served at a rural hospital in Rwanda, and we examined the associa-tions between their ANC visits and the adverse pregnancy and neonatal outcomes by using univariate and mul-tivariate logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Most of the pregnant women had ≥ 4 ANC visits, but 39% (n = 1,911) did not have ≥ 3 visits before delivery. The prev-alence of low birth weight (LBW) and that of preterm birth (PTB) were 12% and 9.9%, respectively. Compared to the women who attended only one ANC visit, those who attended ≥ 4 ANC visits had lower risks of LBW (OR 0.20; 95%CI: 0.11-0.36) and PTB (OR 0.28; 95%CI: 0.11-0.76). Frequent ANC visits were also associ-ated with better postnatal outcomes of the newborns. Encouraging women to attend ANC visits before delivery can markedly reduce PTB-related and LBW-related complications, especially in resource-limited settings.
Document Type
Original Article
Keywords
antenatal care
epidemiology
low birth weight
preterm birth
rural
Link to PubMed
74_6_495.pdf 2.56 MB