JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/48560
FullText URL 66_3_213.pdf
Author Kataoka, Masaki| Kunisada, Toshiyuki| Tanaka, Masato| Takeda, Ken| Itani, Satoru| Sugimoto, Yoshihisa| Misawa, Haruo| Senda, Masuo| Nakahara, Shinnosuke| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract There are a variety of treatment options for patients with spinal metastasis, and predicting prognosis is essential for selecting the proper treatment. The purpose of the present study was to identify the significant prognostic factors for the survival of patients with spinal metastasis. We retrospectively reviewed 143 patients with spinal metastasis. The median age was 61 years. Eleven factors reported previously were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model:gender, age, performance status, neurological deficits, pain, type of primary tumor, metastasis to major organs, previous chemotherapy, disease-free interval before spinal metastasis, multiple spinal metastases, and extra-spinal bone metastasis. The average survival of study patients after the first visit to our clinic was 22 months. Multivariate survival analysis demonstrated that type of primary tumor (hazard ratio [HR]=6.80, p<0.001), metastasis to major organs (HR=2.01, p=0.005), disease-free interval before spinal metastasis (HR=1.77, p=0.028), and extra-spinal bone metastasis (HR=1.75, p=0.017) were significant prognostic factors. Type of primary tumor was the most powerful prognostic factor. Other prognostic factors may differ among the types of primary tumor and may also be closely associated with primary disease activity. Further analysis of factors predicting prognosis should be conducted with respect to each type of primary tumor to help accurately predict prognosis.
Keywords spine metastasis survival prognostic factor cancer
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 213
End Page 219
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22729101
Web of Science KeyUT 000305669700004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/14885
Title Alternative QOL in RA patients
FullText URL 72_071_073.pdf
Author Yokoi, Tadashi| Senda, Masuo| Mitsunobu, Fumihiro| Hosaki, Yasuhiro| Ashida, Kozo| Nishida, Norikazu| Tsugeno, Hirofumi| Okamoto, Makoto| Takata, Shingo| Tanizaki, Yoshiro| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract 近年QOLが重視されるようになってきている。MOS short form 36 health survey (以下SF-36と略す)は,国際的レベルでの基準とされるべく開発された非疾患特異的HRQOL尺度である。今回我々は当院でリハビリテーションをうけているRA患者を対象にSF-36を用いてQOL評価を行った。SFl36の8項目をそれぞれ算出し,国民標準値との比較を行った. すべての項目において標準値を下回っていたが,特に,日常役割機能(身体),日常役割機能(精神),身体の痛み,身体横能において大きな開きを認めた。また,PCSは平均35.8であり,MCSは平均49.1であった。以上より,RA患者は身体に強い痛みを伴っているため精神健康面より身体横能面において制限を有していることが分かった。
Abstract Alternative We have recently regarded the QOL as important. SF-36 is a measure of HRQOL made as an international standard. We investigated the QOL in RA patients who under went rehabilitation in our hospital using SF-36. We calculated 8 items of SF-36 and compared those with Japanese standards. All items in RA patients were lower than Japanese standards. PCS was 35.8 on average and MCS was 49.1 on average.
Keywords SF-36 生活の質 (Quality of Life) 慢性関節リウマチ (Rheumatoid Arthritis)
Publication Title 岡大三朝分院研究報告
Published Date 2002-02-01
Volume volume72
Start Page 71
End Page 73
ISSN 0918-7839
language 日本語
File Version publisher
NAID 120002308553
Author Yokoi, Tadashi| Senda, Masuo| Hamada, Masanori| Mitsunobu, Fumihiro| Hosaki, Yasuhiro| Ashida, Kozo| Iwagaki, Naofumi| Nagata, Takuya| Fujii, Makoto| Takata, Shingo| Tanizaki, Yoshiro| Inoue, Hajime|
Published Date 2004-02-01
Publication Title 岡大三朝医療センター研究報告
Volume volume74
Content Type Departmental Bulletin Paper
Author Yokoi, Tadashi| Senda, Masuo| Mitsunobu, Fumihiro| Hosaki, Yasuhiro| Ashida, Kozo| Nishida, Norikazu| Tsugeno, Hirofumi| Okamoto, Makoto| Nagata, Takuya| Takata, Shingo| Tanizaki, Yoshiro| Inoue, Hajime|
Published Date 2003-02-01
Publication Title 岡大三朝医療センター研究報告
Volume volume73
Content Type Departmental Bulletin Paper
FullText URL CORR477_8_1892.pdf
Author Kunisada, Toshiyuki| Fujiwara, Tomohiro| Hasei, Joe| Nakata, Eiji| Senda, Masuo| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Published Date 2019-08
Publication Title Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Volume volume477
Issue issue8
Publisher Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Start Page 1892
End Page 1901
ISSN 0009-921X
NCID AA00607942
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
OAI-PMH Set 岡山大学
File Version author
PubMed ID 30985613
DOI 10.1097/CORR.0000000000000764
Web of Science KeyUT 000509664400024
Related Url isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000764
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32851
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Shintani, Mai| Senda, Masuo| Takayanagi, Tomoko| Katayama, Yoshimi| Furusawa, Kazunari| Okutani, Tamami| Kataoka, Masaki| Ozaki, Toshifumi|
Abstract <p>To assess the effects of service dogs on health-related quality of life (HRQOL), we conducted a survey of 10 service dog owners using SF-36v2 (Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short-Form Health Survey Version 2.0) and compared it with a matched control group of people with physical disabilities who did not have service dogs but were eligible for one. The scores for mental health and role emotional of service dog owners were relatively high, and their mental component summary was higher than the general population norm. These results indicate that service dogs affect the mentality of their owners. The comparison with the control group indicated that service dogs alleviate the mental burden of daily activities, and subjectively improved the physical functioning of their owners. This study showed that service dogs have positive functional and mental effects on their disabled owners.</p>
Keywords service dog HRQOL SF-36v2 people with physical disability
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 109
End Page 113
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20424665
Web of Science KeyUT 000276996900004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31296
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Takeuchi, Kazuhiro| Inoue, Hajime| Yokoyama, Yoshiki| Senda, Masuo| Ota, Yusuke| Abe, Nobuhiro| Nishida, Keiichiro|
Abstract <p>We studied the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of 120 knees in 86 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and of 14 unaffected knees in 12 control cases. We also developed a scoring system as a quantitative analysis method. We divided the MRI into 10 items, and classified the severity of the symptoms into 4 grades (score 0 to 3). The average total score increased according to the radiographic grade. Soft tissue lesions were clearly detected, even in the early stages of RA. Items such as synovial proliferation showed a high score even in the early stages, suggesting that it was the initial symptom of RA. The score also showed a correlation with the inflammatory signs. These results suggest that this scoring system is very sensitive and yields a good reflection of RA activity. We demonstrated that this system is simple and convenient for routine diagnostic use. We further demonstrated that it is useful for following the advancement of RA and for evaluating the response to treatment.</p>
Keywords rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system synovial membrane
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1998-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume52
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 211
End Page 224
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 9781272
Web of Science KeyUT 000075623600006
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/40012
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Sasaki, Kentaro| Senda, Masuo| Nishida, Keiichiro| Ota, Haruyuki|
Abstract We examined whether the preoperative time required for the Timed "Up and Go" (TUG) test could predict the risk for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients with hip osteoarthritis after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Eighteen patients with DVT diagnosed by venography were selected, and 18 without DVT of the same age and sex and with the same operated side as the DVT group were selected as a control group. We evaluated the 5 preoperative factors that might affect the occurrence of DVT complications, as follows:disease duration, body mass index, serum total cholesterol, subjective pain evaluated by the visual analog scale, and TUG. The JOA hip score (pain, range of motion, walking ability, and daily life) was also evaluated before surgery. As a postoperative factor, we checked the postoperative day when weight-bearing was initiated. As a result, TUG (DVT, 18.4+/-4.0 sec vs. control, 15.0+/-3.2 sec;p0.01) was only significantly different between the 2 groups. The ROC curve revealed that the cut-off point of 15.3 sec in preoperative time for TUG was sensitive (83.3%) and specific (61.1%) for DVT after THA (odds ratio7.0;95% confidence interval, 1.6-30.8). These results suggested that low preoperative ambulatory ability in patients with hip osteoarthritis might be associated with DVT after THA. An improvement in TUG before surgery might contribute to a decrease in the occurrence of DVT after THA.
Keywords preoperative Timed “Up and Go” test deep venous thrombosis total hip arthroplasty hip osteoarthritis
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 197
End Page 201
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20596131
Web of Science KeyUT 000279094300006
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31628
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Masaoka, Shunji| Hashizume, Hiroyuki| Senda, Masuo| Nishida, Keiichiro| Nagoshi, Mitsuru| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract <p>Seventy-nine shoulders suspected of rotator cuff tears were examined by ultrasonography (US) and forty-three received surgery. Long and short axis scans were performed and findings of each were separately classified according to a five-grade system, and the results were correlated with the actual extent of tear observed during surgery. Internal echogenicity and subacromial impingement were analyzed before and after surgery. A accuracy of US in detecting rotator cuff tears was analyzed. In addition, the correlation between cuff shape observed by US before surgery and actual shape observed during surgery was assessed. It was noted that cuff thinning and abnormalities in shape did not recover to normal after surgery. However, in the cases of discontinuities observed by US before surgery, US findings indicated that the torn cuff was anchored to the greater tuberosity and functional during active motion. Although post-operative US findings were not normal, clinical results were good in most cases. Sensitivity of US for detecting rotator cuff tear was 100% and specificity 94%. US is non-invasive, cost effective and allows the physician to examine the joint while it is in motion. Therefore, at this time, we use US as a screening method for detecting rotator cuff tears. Furthermore, US allows us to check for re-tears while the joint is in motion, which is essential for accurate diagnosis.</p>
Keywords rotator cuff tear ultrasonography diagnostic image
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1999-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume53
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 81
End Page 89
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
Web of Science KeyUT 000080058700004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30754
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Matsuo, Toshihiko| Narita, Akiko| Senda, Masuo| Hasebe, Satoshi| Ohtsuki, Hiroshi|
Abstract <p>The purposes of this study were to examine whether body sway is altered immediately after strabismus surgery in children and to find preoperative clinical factors associated with body sway. In a prospective study, body sway was measured on 1-3 days before surgery and on the third day after surgery; for the measurements, computerized static stabilometry was carried out on 28 consecutive patients with strabismus (age range: 3 to 12 years old; mean: 7.4) who underwent strabismus surgery under general anesthesia. The linear length of the sway path (cm), the linear length of the sway path in a particular unit of time (cm/second), and the area of the sway path (cm2), indicative of the extent of body sway, all increased significantly among a total of 28 patients in both conditions of the patient's eyes open and closed, as well as among those in a subgroup of 16 patients with exotropia, after they had undergone strabismus surgery (p &#60; 0.05, Wilcoxon signed ranks test). The center of pressure along the Y axis of orientation from the toe to the heel was found to deviate significantly toward the heel postoperatively, as compared with the preoperative center in the subgroup of 16 patients with exotropia (p &#60; 0.05). Before surgery, 15 patients with no stereoacuity exhibited a greater amount of body sway when their eyes were open than did 13 patients with measurable stereoacuity (p &#60; 0.05, Mann-Whitney U-test). In the subgroup of 16 patients with exotropia when their eyes open, 3 patients with abnormal head posture exhibited more extensive body sway than did 13 patients without abnormal head posture (p &#60; 0.05). Body sway was found to significantly increase immediately after strabismus surgery in children with strabismus. Stereoacuity and abnormal head posture are 2 clinical factors associated with preoperative postural instability.</p>
Keywords body sway strabismus surgery exotropia estropia stabilometry
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2006-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume60
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 13
End Page 24
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 16508685
Web of Science KeyUT 000235538900002
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Yamada, Keiko| Ito, Yoichi M.| Akagi, Masao| Chosa, Etsuo| Fuji, Takeshi| Hirano, Kenichi| Ikeda, Shinichi| Ishibashi, Hideaki| Ishibashi, Yasuyuki| Ishijima, Muneaki| Itoi, Eiji| Iwasaki, Norimasa| Izumida, Ryoichi| Kadoya, Ken| Kamimura, Masayuki| Kanaji, Arihiko| Kato, Hiroyuki| Kishida, Shunji| Mashima, Naohiko| Matsuda, Shuichi| Matsui, Yasumoto| Matsunaga, Toshiki| Miyakoshi, Naohisa| Mizuta, Hiroshi| Nakamura, Yutaka| Nakata, Ken| Omori, Go| Osuka, Koji| Uchio, Yuji| Ryu, Kazuteru| Sasaki, Nobuyuki| Sato, Kimihito| Senda, Masuo| Sudo, Akihiro| Takahira, Naonobu| Tsumura, Hiroshi| Yamaguchi, Satoshi| Yamamoto, Noriaki| Nakamura, Kozo| Takashi, Ohe|
Published Date 2020-03-12
Publication Title Journal of Orthopaedic Science
Publisher Elsevier
ISSN 09492658
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
OAI-PMH Set 岡山大学
Copyright Holders © 2020 The Authors.
File Version publisher
PubMed ID 32173180
DOI 10.1016/j.jos.2020.01.011
Author Senda, Masuo|
Published Date 2012-12-03
Publication Title 岡山医学会雑誌
Volume volume124
Issue issue3
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32290
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Kawabata, Yasuto| Senda, Masuo| Oka, Takahiro| Yagata, Yukihisa| Takahara, Yasuhiro| Nagashima, Hiroaki| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract <p>In order to examine fatigue of the knee flexor and extensor muscles and to investigate the characteristics of muscular fatigue in different sports, a Cybex machine was used to measure muscle fatigue and recovery during isokinetic knee flexion and extension. Eighteen baseball players, 12 soccer players and 13 marathon runners were studied. Each subject was tested in the sitting position and made to perform 50 consecutive right knee bends and stretches at maximum strength. This was done 3 times with an interval of 10 min between each series. The peak torque to body weight ratio and the fatigue rate were determined in each case. In all subjects, the peak torque to body weight ratio was higher for extensors than flexors. Over the 3 trials, the fatigue rate of extensors showed little change, while that of flexors had a tendency to increase. In each subject, knee extensors showed a high fatigue rate but a quick recovery, while knee flexors showed a low fatigue rate but a slow recovery. As the marathon runners had the smallest fatigue rates for both flexors and extensors, we concluded that marathon runners had more stamina than baseball players and soccer players.</p>
Keywords knee flexor and extensor muscle fatigue Cybex machine
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2000-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume54
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 85
End Page 90
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 10806529
Web of Science KeyUT 000086735900005
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32099
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Miyamoto, Noriyoshi| Senda, Masuo| Hamada, Masanori| Katayama, Yoshimi| Kinosita, Atsushi| Uchida, Kensuke| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract <p>Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often associated with deformities of the feet, and foot pain often arises in the talonavicular joint of patients with RA. The object of this study was to assess the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the talonavicular joint and walking ability. The subjects were 35 RA patients (10 feet in 5 males and 56 feet in 30 females) aged 34-87 years (mean: 70 years +/- 12.1), with a disease duration from 1-54 years (mean: 14 years +/- 12.1). MRI findings were classified as follows: Grade 1, almost normal; Grade 2, early articular destruction; Grade 3, moderate articular destruction; Grade 4, severe articular destruction; and Grade 5, bony ankylosis dislocation. Walking ability was classified into one of 9 categories ranging from normal gait to bedridden status according to the system of Fujibayashi. As the grade of MRI images became higher the walking ability decreased, and these parameters showed a correlation by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient analysis (P = 0.003). Thus, in the present cohort group of patients with RA, the deterioration of walking ability increased with the severity of destruction of the talonavicular joint.</p>
Keywords ?rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging talonavicular joint walking ability
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2004-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume58
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 85
End Page 90
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 15255509
Web of Science KeyUT 000221043700004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32087
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Katayama, Yoshimi| Senda, Masuo| Hamada, Masanori| Kataoka, Masaki| Shintani, Mai| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract <p>Muscle power in the lower extremities and body sway were measured in 57 healthy young women volunteers in their 20's. Body sway was measured with a stabilimeter for 30 sec during two-leg standing, and for 10 sec during one-leg standing with the eyes open or closed, alternating between right and left legs (5 times each). The measured parameters of body sway were locus length per time unit, locus length per environmental area, environmental area, rectangle area, root mean square area, and the ratio of sway with eyes closed to sway with eyes open. Knee flexor and extensor power and toe flexor and abductor power were the measures representing lower extremity muscle power. The increase in sway with the eyes closed was more marked during one-leg standing than two-leg standing, as expected. We found that 36 of 57 subjects (62%) were unable to maintain one-leg standing with their eyes closed, and this failure correlated with marked body sway (P = 0.0086). Many subjects had one leg that was classified as stable and the other leg classified as unstable. Clearly, testing of both legs alternately with eyes closed is necessary to measure the full range of sway in subjects. Lower extremity muscle power did not appear to be the dominant factor in maintaining balance in these young subjects.</p>
Keywords postural balance woman lower extremity muscle power
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2004-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume58
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 189
End Page 195
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 15551756
Web of Science KeyUT 000223559700003
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31970
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Sasaki, Kentaro| Senda, Masuo| Ishikura, Takashi| Ota, Haruyuki| Mori, Takeshi| Tsukiyama, Hisashi| Hamada, Masanori| Shiota, Naofumi|
Abstract <p>We examined whether ambulatory ability before surgery might influence the post-operative D-dimer level after total hip arthroplasty (THA). One hundred two patients with hip osteoarthritis receiving THA were included in the current study. The patients were all female, and their ages ranged from 45 to 81 (average 65.0 +- 9.3 years). Age, operated side, body mass index (BMI), disease duration before surgery, pre-operative pain evaluated by visual analogue scale (VAS), total cholesterol value, maximal circumference of the lower leg of the operated side, and timed &#34;Up &#38; Go&#34;test (TUG) before surgery, were retrospectively investigated to examine their relationship with D-dimer levels on post-operative day 7. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the D-dimer value: over 10 microg/ml (Group D), and under (Group N). Patients in group D (N= 52)were older, had a higher BMI, and had less ambulatory ability than patients in group N (N= 50). As age showed a relationship with the D-dimer value on the 7th day and TUG results, patients in the 2 groups were further subdivided into 50's, 60's, and 70's age brackets. In the 50's bracket, patients in group D had higher BMI than patients in group N, but time for TUG was not significantly different. In the 60's and 70's bracket, patients in group D had less ambulatory ability than patients in group N, but the time for TUG was not directly correlated with the D-dimer value. The results suggest that pre-operative low ambulatory ability in patients with osteoarthritis over 60 years might influence the postoperative D-dimer after THA, indicating the potential risk for post-operative deep venous thrombosis.</p>
Keywords timed “Up& Go”test D-dimer total hip arthroplasty
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2005-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume59
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 225
End Page 230
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 16286960
Web of Science KeyUT 000232835600007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31644
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Takahiro, Hirooka| Hashizume, Hiroyuki| Senda, Masuo| Nagoshi, Mitsuru| Inoue, Hajime| Nagashima, Hiroaki|
Abstract <p>Forty-one hands of 37 patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome treated by endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) were followed up for more than one year after surgery. Surgical results were evaluated using Kelly's criteria, the Semmes-Weinstein test, the static and moving 2-point discrimination tests, tip-pinch strength, and motor and sensory nerve conduction studies. Clinical results, according to Kelly's criteria three months after surgery, were excellent or good in 36 hands, and fair or poor in five hands. No recovery was evident at six months and 12 months after surgery in fair and poor hands. Based on these findings, we conclude that a neurolysis of the median nerve and release of constriction of the thenar muscle branch should be performed using the conventional open technique for patients with poor results three months after ECTR if the patients are dissatisfied with ECTR results</p>
Keywords carpal tunnel syndrome endoscopic carpal tunnel release idiopathic
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1999-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume53
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 39
End Page 44
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
Web of Science KeyUT 000078897700007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31621
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Nakago, Kie| Senda, Masuo| Touno, Midori| Takahara, Yasuhiro| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract <p>The influence of mild exercise on skeletal muscle fibers was investigated histochemically to assess the effects of exercise on steroid myopathy and its efficacy for preventing this disease. Twenty male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups of 5 each: group T, which received exercise alone; group S which received steroid alone; group ST which received both exercise and steroid; and group C, the control group. In groups S and ST, hydrocortisone was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. In the exercise groups, the animals were made to run at a speed of 15 m/min for about 1 h/day for 5 days a week on a treadmill. After the completion of treadmill exercise and steroid administration for 4 weeks, the rats were anesthetized with Nembutal, the soleus muscle (SOL) and the extensor digitorum longus muscle (EDL) were removed and prepared for examinations. The area of type I fibers in the SOL was significantly larger in group ST than in group S. The area of type IIa fibers in the EDL was significantly larger in group ST than in group S. In group S, the proportion of type I fibers in the SOL was significantly lower than in the other three groups. There was little difference in fiber type distribution between groups ST and C. These results suggest that steroid myopathy can be prevented by even mild exercise.</p>
Keywords exercise muscle fibers steroid myopathy
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1999-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume53
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 265
End Page 270
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 10631381
Web of Science KeyUT 000084414300004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31617
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Senda, Masuo| Takahara, Yasuhiro| Yagata, Yukihisa| Yamamoto, Kazushi| Nagashima, Hiroaki| Tukiyama, Hisashi| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract <p>The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the strength of the foot muscles that control the toes and disorders such as shin splint. In order to this, we designed and built a toe dynamometer to compare the muscle power exerted through the toes in top female marathon runners and age-matched women not involved in sports. The subjects were 12 top-level female marathon runners (Group A) and 37 student nurses who were not involved in sports (Group B). We devised a dynamometer to measure the total power exerted by the flexor muscles of the 5 toes of a single foot (total flexor power) and the combined power of the abductors of the big (1st) and little (5th) toes (abductor power). In Group A, the total flexor power was 14.3 +/- 5.3 kg in the right foot and 15.4 +/- 4.7 kg in the left foot. The abductor power was 1.9 +/- 1.8 kg in the right foot and 2.2 +/- 1.9 kg in the left foot. In Group B, total flexor power was 18.3 +/- 6.7 kg in the right foot, while the abductor power was 1.9 +/- 1.7 kg. The subjects from Group A with an arch index &#60; 1.0 (n = 8) or &#62; 1.0 (n = 4) were respectively classified as Group I and Group II. In Group I, total flexor power was 14.9 +/- 5.3 kg (right) and 15.5 +/- 5.2 kg (left), while the abductor power was 2.6 +/- 1.9 kg (right), and 3.1 +/- 1.7 kg (left). In Group II, the total flexor power was 13.2 +/- 5.8 kg (right) and 15.1 +/- 4.2 kg (left), while the abductor power was 0.7 +/- 0.6 kg (right) and 0.3 +/- 0.2 kg (left). The abductor power of toes was significantly lower in Group II than in Group I. The incidence of posteromedial shin pain was higher in Group II (75.0%) than in Group I (12.5%).</p>
Keywords toe muscle power female marathon runner toe dynamometer
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1999-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume53
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 189
End Page 191
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 10488406
Web of Science KeyUT 000082334300005
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31614
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Hasegawa, Kenya| Hashizume, Hiroyuki| Senda, Masuo| Kawai, Akira| Inoue, Hajime|
Abstract To evaluate the usefulness of endoscopic carpal tunnel release (ECTR) on patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome, multiple aspects of the results of 44 hands (42 patients) treated by ECTR and 40 hands (40 patients) treated by open carpal tunnel release (OCTR) were compared. Results of ECTR were compared with those of OCTR to study not only recovery rate and surgical safety but also cost-effectiveness. Although ECTR was much less invasive than OCTR, recovery of median nerve palsy in the ECTR group was not as good as that in the OCTR group one month after the surgery. Three months after surgery, the palsy of patients treated by ECTR had improved to almost the same extent as in those treated by OCTR. There were no major surgical complications in both ECTR and OCTR groups. The cost and time needed for ECTR treatment was 1/3 of those needed for OCTR. ECTR reduced both cost and treatment time, which is beneficial for both doctors and patients.
Keywords carpal tunnel syndrome surgical treatment endoscopic carpal tunnel release open carpal tunnel release
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1999-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume53
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 179
End Page 183
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders Copyright© Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 10488404
Web of Science KeyUT 000082334300003
Related Url http://ousar.lib.okayama-u.ac.jp/metadata/5223