JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/55587
FullText URL 71_6_505.pdf
Author Honda, Yoshihiro| Takigawa, Nagio| Ichihara, Eiki| Ninomiya, Takashi| Kubo, Toshio| Ochi, Nobuaki| Yasugi, Masayuki| Murakami, Toshi| Yamane, Hiromichi| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Abstract (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been shown to bind to several receptors including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors are effective for non-small cell lung cancers harboring activating EGFR mutations and ALK or c-ros oncogene 1 (ROS1) fusion genes, respectively. We investigated the effects of EGCG on EGFR- or fusion gene-driven lung cancer cells such as PC-9, RPC-9, H1975, H2228 and HCC78. The five cell lines had similar sensitivity to EGCG. Phosphorylated (p)EGFR, pAkt and pErk in PC-9, RPC-9 and H1975 cells were suppressed by EGCG (50 or 100 μM). EGCG also inhibited pALK in H2228, pROS1 in HCC78, and pErk and pAkt in both cell lines. All the xenograft tumors established using the 5 cell lines in EGCG-treated groups were significantly smaller than the tumors in the vehicle-treated groups. The numbers of tumor blood vessels of xenograft tissues in EGCG-treated mice were significantly lower than those in vehicle-treated mice. In conclusion, EGCG may be effective for EGFR-driven lung tumors irrespective of the presence of T790M, and for ALK or ROS1 fusion gene-driven lung tumors.
Keywords epigallocatechin-3-gallate lung cancer EGFR ALK ROS1
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2017-12
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume71
Issue issue6
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 505
End Page 512
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2017 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 29276223
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/54499
FullText URL 70_4_243.pdf
Author Osawa, Masahiro| Ohashi, Kadoaki| Kubo, Toshio| Ichihara, Eiki| Takata, Saburo| Takigawa, Nagio| Takata , Minoru| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Abstract Vandetanib (ZactimaTM) is a novel, orally available inhibitor of both vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. In the present study, a line of transgenic mice with a mouse Egfr gene mutation (delE748-A752) corresponding to a human EGFR mutation (delE746-A750) was established. The transgenic mice developed atypical adenomatous hyperplasia to adenocarcinoma of the lung at around 5 weeks of age and died of lung tumors at approximately 17 weeks of age. In the mice treated with vandetanib (6mg/kg/day), these lung tumors disappeared and the phosphorylations of EGFR and VEGFR-2 were reduced in lung tissues to levels comparable to those of non-transgenic control mice. The median overall survival time of the transgenic mice was 28 weeks in the vandetanib-treated group and 17 weeks in the vehicle-treated group. Vandetanib significantly prolonged the survival of the transgenic mice (log-rank test, p<0.01); resistance to vandetanib occurred at 20 weeks of age and the animals died from their lung tumors at about 28 weeks of age. These data suggest that vandetanib could suppress the progression of tumors harboring an activating EGFR mutation.
Keywords vandetanib VEGFR EGFR nonsmall cell lung cancer transgenic mouse
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2016-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume70
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 243
End Page 253
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2016 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 27549668
Web of Sience KeyUT 000384748600003
Author Yasugi, Masayuki| Takigawa, Nagio| Ochi, Nobuaki| Ohashi, Kadoaki| Harada, Daijiro| Ninomiya, Takashi| Murakami, Toshi| Honda, Yoshihiro| Ichihara, Eiki| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2014-08-15
Publication Title Experimental Cell Research
Volume volume326
Issue issue2
Content Type Journal Article
Author Ochi, Nobuaki| Takigawa, Nagio| Harada, Daijiro| Yasugi, Masayuki| Ichihara, Eiki| Hotta, Katsuyuki| Tabata, Masahiro| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2014-03-10
Publication Title Experimental Cell Research
Volume volume322
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Murakami, Toshi| Takigawa, Nagio| Ninomiya, Takashi| Ochi, Nobuaki| Yasugi, Masaaki| Honda, Yoshihiro| Kubo, Toshio| Ichihara, Eiki| Hotta, Katsuyuki| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2014-01
Publication Title Lung Cancer
Volume volume83
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Hayakawa, Hiromi| Ichihara, Eiki| Ohashi, Kadoaki| Ninomiya, Takashi| Yasugi, Masayuki| Takata, Saburo| Sakai, Katsuya| Matsumoto, Kunio| Takigawa, Nagio| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2013-11
Publication Title Cancer Science
Volume volume104
Issue issue11
Content Type Journal Article
Author Ninomiya, Takashi| Takigawa, Nagio| Ichihara, Eiki| Ochi, Nobuaki| Murakami, Toshi| Honda, Yoshihiro| Kubo, Toshio| Minami, Daisuke| Kudo, Kenichiro| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2013-05
Publication Title Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Volume volume12
Issue issue5
Content Type Journal Article
Author Takeda, Hiromasa| Takigawa, Nagio| Ohashi, Kadoaki| Minami, Daisuke| Kataoka, Itaru| Ichihara, Eiki| Ochi, Nobuaki| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2013-02-15
Publication Title Experimental Cell Research
Volume volume319
Issue issue4
Content Type Journal Article
Author Harada, Daijiro| Takigawa, Nagio| Ochi, Nobuaki| Ninomiya, Takashi| Yasugi, Masayuki| Kubo, Toshio| Takeda, Hiromasa| Ichihara, Eiki| Ohashi, Kadoaki| Takata, Saburo| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2012-10
Publication Title Cancer Science
Volume volume103
Issue issue10
Content Type Journal Article
Author Kubo, Toshio| Takigawa, Nagio| Osawa, Masahiro| Harada, Daijiro| Ninomiya, Takashi| Ochi, Nobuaki| Ichihara, Eiki| Yamane, Hiromichi| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2013-01
Publication Title Cancer Science
Volume volume104
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
Author Rai, Kammei| Takigawa, Nagio| Ito, Sachio| Kashihara, Hiromi| Ichihara, Eiki| Yasuda, Tatsuji| Shimizu, Kenji| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Published Date 2011-09
Publication Title Molecular Cancer Therapeutics
Volume volume10
Issue issue9
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/48564
FullText URL 66_3_245.pdf
Author Okada, Toshiaki| Takigawa, Nagio| Kishino, Daizo| Katayama, Hideki| Kuyama, Shouichi| Sato, Ken| Mimoto, Junko| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Tanimoto, Mitsune| Kiura, Katsuyuki|
Abstract Cisplatin is used to treat lung cancer;however, it is also a known carcinogen. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors have been shown to prevent carcinogen-induced experimental tumors. We investigated the effect of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, on cisplatin-induced lung tumors. One hundred twenty 4-week-old A/J mice were divided into 6 groups:group 1, no treatment;group 2, low-dose celecoxib (150mg/kg);group 3, high-dose celecoxib (1,500mg/kg);group 4, cisplatin alone;group 5, cisplatin plus low-dose celecoxib;and group 6, cisplatin plus high-dose celecoxib. Mice in groups 4-6 were administered cisplatin (1.62mg/kg, i.p.) once a week for 10 weeks between 7 and 16 weeks of age. All mice were sacrificed at week 30. Tumor incidence was 15.8% in group 1, 25% in group 2, 26.3% in group 3, 60% in group 4, 50% in group 5, and 50% in group 6. Tumor multiplicity was 0.2, 0.3, 0.3, 1.3, 1.0, and 0.6 in groups 1-6, respectively. Tumor multiplicity in the cisplatin-treated mice was reduced by celecoxib treatment in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, group 4 vs. group 6). Celecoxib significantly reduced COX-2 expression in cisplatin-induced tumors (p<0.01, group 4 vs. group 6).
Keywords cisplatin non-small cell lung cancer celecoxib cyclooxygenase-2 chemoprevention
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2012-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume66
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 245
End Page 251
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
Copyright Holders CopyrightⒸ 2012 by Okayama University Medical School
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 22729105
Web of Sience KeyUT 000305669700008
Author Nogami, Naoyuki| Hotta, Katsuyuki| Kuyama, Shoichi| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Takigawa, Nagio| Chikamori, Kenichi| Shibayama, Takuo| Kishino, Daizo| Hosokawa, Shinobu| Tamaoki, Akihiko| Harita, Shingo| Tabata, Masahiro| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Shinkai, Tetsu| Tanimoto, Mitsune|
Published Date 2011-10
Publication Title Lung Cancer
Volume volume74
Issue issue1
Content Type Journal Article
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32866
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Fujimoto, Nobukazu| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Takigawa, Nagio| Fujiwara, Yoshiro| Toyooka, Shinichi| Umemura, Shigeki| Tabata, Masahiro| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Tanimoto, Mitsune|
Abstract <p>We examined the feasibility of triplet chemotherapy using cisplatin, docetaxel, and irinotecan for patients with recurrent or refractory non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), retrospectively. Twenty-five patients (21 men and 4 women) with NSCLC and good performance status who were &#60;70 years old were analyzed. The median age was 58 years. Most patients had performance status 1 (16/25), stage IV disease (18/25) and adenocarcinoma-histology (16/25). Cisplatin and docetaxel were given on day 1 and irinotecan on day 2;the cycle was repeated every 3 weeks. The objective response rate was 39.1% (95% confidence interval:18.7-59.5%). The median survival time and actual 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 14.3 months, 32%, 20%, and 8%, respectively. Of note, only 6 patients were treated with gefitinib at the recurrence after triplet chemotherapy;of these, 4 (67%) achieved a partial response, which might result in favorable survival. Grade 3/4 toxicities consisted of neutropenia (100%), neutropenic fever (56%), nausea/vomiting (40%), and diarrhea (16%);no cases of treatment-related death occurred. Triplet chemotherapy showed impressive survival data in our clinical trial, but proved too toxic for use in treating patients with NSCLC in the clinical practice.</p>
Keywords cisplatin docetaxel irinotecan triplet chemotherapy gefitinib
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2010-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume64
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 33
End Page 37
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 20200582
Web of Sience KeyUT 000274868300005
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32669
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Takigawa, Nagio| Ohnoshi, Taisuke| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Kimura, Ikuro|
Abstract <p>An etoposide-resistant subline, SBC-3/ETP, from a human small cell lung cancer cell line, SBC-3, was developed by continuous exposure to increasing concentrations of etoposide in culture. The SBC-3/ETP was 52.1-fold more resistant to etoposide than the parent cell line. The SBC-3/ETP was highly cross-resistant to teniposide, adriamycin, vinca alkaloids, 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, CPT-11 and mitomycin C, and marginally cross-resistant to cisplatin, while the subline showed a collateral sensitivity to bleomycin. Topoisomerase I activity in the SBC-3/ETP was reduced to an extent of one half and topoisomerase II activity to an extent of one eighth in comparison with those of the SBC-3. Intracellular accumulation of [3H]-etoposide in the SBC-3/ETP was significantly lower in comparison to the SBC-3. An overexpression of MDR1 mRNA, and the presence of its product, P-glycoprotein, were detected in the SBC-3/ETP by Northern blotting and flowcytometry using a monoclonal antibody of the protein, MRK16. These results indicate that a decreased activity of topoisomerase II is the major factor for the development of etoposide resistance, and that an overexpression of the MDR1 gene is responsible, in part, for the development of resistance to the drug and some structurally unrelated compounds such as adriamycin and vinca alkaloids.</p>
Keywords small cell lung cancer etoposide-resistant cell line P-glycoprotein topoisomerase
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1992-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume46
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 203
End Page 212
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 1354408
Web of Sience KeyUT A1992JB50400009
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32631
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Takigawa, Nagio| Ohnoshi, Taisuke| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Kimura, Ikuro|
Abstract <p>In an attempt to predict the clinical activity of newly developed anthracycline analogues, ME2303, KRN8602, and SM5887 in the treatment of lung cancer, we compared antitumor activity of these drugs with that of adriamycin, using six human lung cancer cell lines and two drug-resistant human lung cancer sublines. Taking the pharmacokinetic data into consideration, we evaluated the relative antitumor activity: the ratio of area under the concentration-time curve of each drug to the 50% inhibitory concentration of the drug. Regarding this ratio, ME2303 was more potent than adriamycin, SM5887, and KRN8602. Cross-resistance of the new analogues to adriamycin was investigated using an adriamycin-resistant small cell lung cancer subline, SBC-3/ADM100 and an etoposide-resistant subline, SBC-3/ETP. SBC-3/ADM100 being 106-fold more resistant to adriamycin than the parent SBC-3 showed less resistance to the analogues: 1.80-fold to KRN8602, 3.80-fold to SM5887, and 8.60-fold to ME2303. SBC-3/ETP which was 52.1-fold more resistant to etoposide and 39.5-fold more resistant to adriamycin were also less resistant to the new analogues: 3.27-fold to KRN8602, 9.07-fold to SM5887, and 17.3-fold to ME2303. In conclusion, ME2303 was found to be the most potent agent among drugs tested for the treatment of lung cancer, and KRN8602 can be expected to be beneficial for the treatment of drug-resistant small cell lung cancer.</p>
Keywords new anthracycline analogues ME2303 KRN8602 SM5887 lung cancer cell line
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1992-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume46
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 249
End Page 256
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 1442149
Web of Sience KeyUT A1992JL44200004
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31714
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Kawada, Kazuhiko| Yonei, Toshiro| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Tabata, Masahiro| Takigawa, Nagio| Harada, Mine| Tanimoto, Mitsune|
Abstract <p>When the development of chemotherapeutic agents reaches the clinical trial stage, it is necessary to perform drug sensitivity tests quickly in order to select the most promising agents for the treatment of cancer. In order to assess the possibility of using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a substitute for the human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA), we evaluated the correlation between the results obtained by these 2 assays in 5 human lung cancer cell lines. The correlation coefficient between the results of the HTCA and the MTT assay was 0.673, indicating a relatively good correlation. The correlation was most prominent in platinum analogues (r = 0.939) and good in anthracyclines/anthracenedione (r = 0.611). However, no significant correlation was observed in vinca alkaloids, etoposide, irinotecan, SN-38 (an active metabolite of irinotecan), and rhizoxin. The results of the MTT assay showed a high degree of correlation with those of the HTCA in predicting the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to platinum analogues, and anthracyclines/anthracenedione. These results suggest that the MTT assay may be more convenient and quickly performed than the HTCA and can replace HTCA in evaluating the effects of anticancer agents, especially the platinum analogues and anthracyclines/anthracenedione.</p>
Keywords chemosensitivity test 3-(4 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2 5-diphenyltertrazolium bromide (MTT) assay clonogenic assay
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2002-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume56
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 129
End Page 134
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 12108583
Web of Sience KeyUT 000176521200002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31705
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Takata, Ichiro| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Tabata, Masahiro| Takigawa, Nagio| Katayama, Hideki| Takemoto, Mitsuhiro| Hiraki, Yoshio| Harada, Mine| Tanimoto, Mitsune|
Abstract <p>A pilot study was conducted to assess the efficacy and feasibility of daily low-dose cisplatin with concurrent thoracic irradiation for clinically unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with inoperable NSCLC who had poor risk factors such as advanced age, poor performance status, poor lung function, or concomitant active malignancy were entered into the study. Low-dose cisplatin (6 mg/m2) was administered daily before concurrent thoracic irradiation (2 Gy/day; total dose of 60 Gy) was given. Twenty-five patients were registered. The majority of the patients had either stage IIIA (24.0%) or stage IIIB (60.0%) disease. Fifteen patients (60.0%) completed the planned treatment. Both chemotherapy and radiotherapy were stopped in 3 patients (12.0%) due to poor response, and 7 patients (28.0%) partly received radiotherapy alone as a result of their toxicity response. The proportion of total administered dose to planned dose was 90.9% for chemotherapy and 99.3% for radiotherapy, which were comparable to those in previous studies for LA-NSCLC patients without poor risk factors. Grade 3 leukopenia and neutropenia developed in 14 patients (56.0%) and 10 patients (40.0%), respectively, but grade 4 toxicity was not encountered. Grade 3 pneumonitis and esophagitis were observed in 4 patients (16.0%) and 2 patients (8.0%), respectively. The overall response rate was 60.0%. The median survival time was 22 months, and the 2-year survival rate was 50.3%. Daily low-dose cisplatin and concurrent thoracic irradiation were well tolerated even by poor-risk patients with NSCLC, and showed a therapeutic efficacy similar to that for good-risk patients.</p>
Keywords non-small-cell lung cancer concurrent chemoradiotherapy low-dose cisplatin poor-risk factor
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2002-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume56
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 261
End Page 266
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 12530510
Web of Sience KeyUT 000178668100007
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31552
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Yonei, Toshiro| Ohnoshi, Taisuke| Hiraki, Shunkichi| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Moritaka, Tomonori| Shibayama, Takuo| Tabata, Masahiro| Segawa, Yoshihiko| Takigawa, Nagio| Kimura, Ikuro|
Abstract <p>Antitumor activities of five platinum analogs, including cisplatin, carboplatin, 254-S, DWA2114R, and NK121, were compared using five human lung cancer cell lines and 19 tumor specimens obtained from lung cancer patients. The antitumor activity was evaluated by determining the ratio of the maximum tolerated dose of each drug to the 70% tumor growth inhibitory concentration in a colony assay. Cisplatin was the most potent agent, followed by 254-S and carboplatin. DWA2114R and NK121 were less potent than cisplatin and 254-S. Cross-resistance to adriamycin was also investigated using an adriamycin-resistant small cell lung cancer subline, SBC -3/ADM30. SBC-3/ADM30 was 1.7- to 4.0-fold more resistant to cisplatin, carboplatin, NK121, and DWA2114R, than was the parent line, SBC-3, and the subline was 2.0-fold more sensitive to 254-S. Using SBC-3, in vitro combination effects of etoposide and cisplatin, carboplatin, or 254-S were evaluated by the median-effect principle. Synergism was noted when cisplatin and etoposide were combined at a fixed molar ratio of 1:1. Combination of carboplatin and etoposide showed an additive effect. The combination of 254-S and etoposide was antagonistic at low concentrations, but was markedly synergistic at higher concentrations. These data suggested the efficacy of 254-S in the treatment of lung cancer.</p>
Keywords platinum analogs antitumor activity lung cancer colony assay combination effect
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1993-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume47
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 233
End Page 241
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 8213217
Web of Sience KeyUT A1993LV73800003
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30795
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Matsuo, Keisuke| Kiura, Katsuyuki| Ueoka, Hiroshi| Tabata, Masahiro| Shibayama, Takuo| Matsumura, Tadashi| Takigawa, Nagio| Hiraki, Shunkichi| Harada, Mine|
Abstract <p>We have established an Adriamycin (ADM) -resistant small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line, SBC-3/ADM100, which shows multifactorial mechanisms of resistance to ADM, such as overexpression of P-glycoprotein, an enhanced detoxifying system and a decrease in topoisomerase II activity. In the present study, we confirmed that SBC-3/ADM 100 showed collateral sensitivity to methotrexate and TNP-351, a new antifolate, though this cell line showed a typical multidrug resistance (MDR) pattern. We also demonstrated a faster uptake and higher accumulation (1.3-fold) of TNP-351 in the SBC-3/ADM100 cells than those in the parent SBC-3 cells. These results explain one of the mechanisms for collateral sensitivity in the resistant cells. Furthermore, this cell line was found to have no cross-resistance to edatrexate and minimal cross-resistance to trimetrexate, 254-S (cisplatin analog), 5-fluorouracil and 4-hydroperoxyifosfamide. These drugs will have clinical importance in patients with SCLC who were previously treated with an ADM-containing regimen. Thus, antifolates, especially TNP-351 and edatrexate, can be expected to eradicate residual multidrug resistant SCLC cells selected by ADM.</p>
Keywords Adriamycin-resistant cell line antifolates small cell lung cancer
Amo Type Article
Published Date 1997-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume51
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 121
End Page 127
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 9227790
Web of Sience KeyUT A1997XJ12700002