JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32109
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Sato, Kyoko| Kawakami, Norito| Ohtsu, Tadahiro| Tsutsumi, Akizumi| Miyazaki, Shougo| Masumoto, Takeshi| Horie, Seichi| Haratani, Takashi| Kobayashi, Fumio| Araki, Shunichi|
Abstract <p>Previous in vitro and animal experiments have shown that sulforaphane, which is abundant in broccoli, inhibits Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and blocks gastric tumor formation. This suggests that broccoli consumption prevents chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) introduced by H. pylori infection and, therefore, gastric cancer. For an epidemiological investigation of the relationship between the broccoli consumption and CAG, a cross-sectional study of 438 male employees, aged 39 to 60 years, of a Japanese steel company was conducted. CAG was serologically determined with serum cut-off values set at pepsinogen I &#60; or = 70 ng/ml and a ratio of serum pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II &#60; or = 3.0. Broccoli consumption (weekly frequency) and diet were monitored by using a 31-item food frequency questionnaire. The prevalence of CAG among men who ate broccoli once or more weekly was twice as high as that among men who consumed a negligible amount (P &#60; 0.05). Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that broccoli consumption once or more weekly significantly increased the risk for CAG (odds ratio, 3.06; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-8.38; P &#60; 0.05), after controlling for age, education, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption. The present study failed to show an expected association between frequent broccoli consumption and a low prevalence of CAG.</p>
Keywords broccoli sulforaphane chronic atrophic gastritis pepsinogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2004-06
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume58
Issue issue3
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 127
End Page 133
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 15471434
Web of Science KeyUT 000222273300003
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/31986
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Ochiai, Hirotaka| Ohtsu, Tadahiro| Tsuda, Toshihide| Kagawa, Haruko| Kawashita, Toshiaki| Takao, Soshi| Tsutsumi, Akizumi| Kawakami, Norito|
Abstract <p>On February 13, 2002, a public health center in Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan, was notified that many individuals living at the Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force base had symptoms resembling those of food poisoning. Self-administered questionnaires requesting information regarding meal consumption and symptoms were distributed to all 281 members at the base. A case of the illness was defined as a member who had had watery or mucousy stool, or loose stool with abdominal cramps, more than twice a day after consuming dinner on February 12. Control of the illness was defined as a member with no symptoms. The dinner on February 12 was significantly associated with the illness (Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio: 3.59, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-12.20). A case-control study showed that, among the food supplied at dinner on February 12, the braised chop suey was significantly associated with the illness (odds ratio: 12.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.90-521.00). The braised chop suey had been stored in a chafing dish. An environmental investigation indicated that Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) in the chafing dish proliferated under an inappropriate heat-retention temperature, and the contaminated braised chop suey could have caused the food poisoning. This study demonstrated that the recommended heat-retention temperature (over 65 degrees C) should be confirmed thoroughly.</p>
Keywords outbreak Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) epidemiology food poisoning
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2005-02
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume59
Issue issue1
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 27
End Page 32
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 15902996
Web of Science KeyUT 000227263300004