JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32828
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Liu, Jie| Yagi, Takahito| Sadamori, Hiroshi| Matsukawa, Hiroyoshi| Sun, Dong-Sheng| Mitsuoka, Naoshi| Yamamura, Masao| Matsuoka, Junji| Jin, Zaishun| Yamamoto, Itaru| Tanaka, Noriaki|
Abstract <p>Controversy exists over whether the predominant cell death of hepatocytes is due to apoptosis or necrosis after ischemia/reperfusion injury. In this study we investigated the predominant cell death of hepatocytes after cold ischemia/reperfusion injury using the Annexin V-based assay, and evaluated the anti-apoptotic effect of ascorbic acid 2-glucoside (AA-2G) added to the University of Wisconsin solution (UW solution) in rat liver transplantation. The retrieved liver was preserved in 4 UW solution for 24 h, and then transplanted orthotopically to the syngeneic Wistar recipient. The animals were divided into 2 groups, a control group (n=10), in which liver grafts were preserved in UW solution (4), and an AA-2G group (n=10), in which liver grafts were preserved in UW solution (4) with AA-2G (100 ug/ml). The serum AST level 4 h after reperfusion in the control group was significantly suppressed in the AA-2G group, and the bile production of the liver graft in the AA-2G group was well recovered. The mean survival time in the AA-2G group was significantly improved compared with that in the control group. Annexin-V and Propidium iodide staining 4 h after reperfusion showed a significantly higher percentage of viable hepatocytes in the AA-2G group compared with the control group (93.4 +/- 2.0 vs. 80.3 +- 2.1%, P&#60;0.05). In the control group, the main cell death of hepatocytes was apoptosis (early apoptosis: 10.0 +- 4.7%, late apoptosis: 6.4 +/- 1.7%). The addition of AA-2G to the UW solution significantly inhibited both early and late apoptotic cell death 4 h after reperfusion (early apoptosis: 0.98 +/- 0.88%, late apoptosis: 2.2 +/- 1.1%). The expression of caspase 9 in the immunostaining of the liver graft was suppressed in the AA-2G group compared with in the control group. Our study using the Annexin V-based assay provided evidence that the predominant cell death of hepatocytes was apoptosis after 24 h cold ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat liver transplantation. The addition of AA-2G to the UW solution attenuated 24 h cold ischemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting the apoptosis of hepatocytes.</p>
Keywords apoptosis ischemia/ reperfusion injury liver transplantation ascorbic acid 2- glucoside(AA-2G)
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2003-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume57
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 209
End Page 216
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 14679398
Web of Science KeyUT 000186186000001
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32293
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Jin, Zaishun| Teramoto, Norihiro| Yoshino, Tadashi| Takada, Kenzo| Oka, Takashi| Hayashi, Kazuhiko| Akagi, Tadaatsu|
Abstract <p>It has been reported that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) resides in resting B cells in vivo. However, an ideal in vitro system for studying EBV latent infection in vivo has not yet been established. In this study, a mantle cell lymphoma line, SP53, was successfully infected with a recombinant EBV containing a neomycin-resistant gene. The EBV-carrying SP53 cells were obtained by selection using G418. They expressed EBER-1, EBNAs, and LMP1; this expression pattern of the EBV genes was similar to that in a lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL). However, proliferation assay showed that the EBV-carrying SP53 cells have a doubling time of 73 h, compared with 57 h of SP53 cells. Transplantation of 10(8) SP53 cells to nude mice formed tumors in 4 of 10 mice inoculated, but the EBV-carrying SP53 cells did not. Unexpectedly, EBV infection reduced the proliferation and tumorigenicity of SP53 cells. However, the EBV-carrying SP53 cells showed higher resistance to apoptosis induced by serum starvation than did the SP53 cells. The inhibition of proliferation and the resistance to apoptosis induced in SP53 cells by EBV infection indicate that this cell line might to some extent provide a model of in vivo EBV reservoir cells.</p>
Keywords Epstein-Barr virus mantle cell lymphoma latent infection in vivo reservoir SP53 line
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2000-10
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume54
Issue issue5
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 193
End Page 200
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 11061568
Web of Science KeyUT 000090098600002
JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/32097
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Koirala, Tirtha Raj| Hayashi, Kazuhiko| Jin, Zaishun| Onoda, Sachiyo| Tanaka, Takehiro| Oda, Wakako| Ichimura, Koichi| Ohara, Nobuya| Oka, Takashi| Yamada, Masao| Yoshino, Tadashi|
Abstract <p>Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-related herpesvirus (Si-IIA-EBV) was serially transmitted for 3 passages from rabbit to rabbit of the opposite sex by blood transfusion, which subsequently induced virus-associated rabbit lymphomas. The virus could be transmitted by transfusion with 15-20 ml of whole blood (7/7) or irradiated blood (1/6) from the EBV-related virus-infected rabbits, but there was no transmission with transfusion of cell-free plasma (0/6) from the infected rabbits. Passive anti-EBV-VCA IgG (x 20 approximately x 10) titers decreased during the first 1-2 weeks in the transfused rabbits. The virus-transmitted rabbits showed a gradual increase in antibody titers ranging from peak titers of x 640 to x 2560 after 3 weeks of transfusion. The recipient origin of malignant lymphoma that developed in the first rabbit transfused by infected blood was confirmed by chromosomal analysis. This rabbit model thus shows that EBV-related herpesvirus is serially transmissible by blood transfusion and that transmission can not be completely prevented by irradiation of blood, but removal of blood cells is the best way to prevent transmission of EBV-related virus. Therefore, this animal model provides a convenient in vivo system for studies of the prevention and therapy of transfusion-related transmission of EBV and EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised human beings.</p>
Keywords ?Epstein-Barr virus(EBV) rabbit lymphoproliferative diseases blood transfusion
Amo Type Article
Published Date 2004-04
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume58
Issue issue2
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 67
End Page 74
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 15255507
Web of Science KeyUT 000221043700002