JaLCDOI 10.18926/AMO/30938
FullText URL fulltext.pdf
Author Babazono, Akira| Kitajima, Hiroyuki| Nishimaki, Shigeru| Nakamura, Tomohiko| Shiga, Seigo| Hayakawa, Masahiro| Tanaka, Tahei| Sato, Kazuo| Nakayama, Hideki| Ibara, Satoshi| Une, Hiroshi| Doi, Hiroyuki|
Abstract <p>We evaluated the infection risks in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using data of NICU infection surveillance data. The subjects were 871 NICU babies, consisting of 465 boys and 406 girls, who were cared for between June 2002 and January 2003 in 7 medical institutions that employed NICU infection surveillance. Infections were defined according to the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) System. Of the 58 babies with nosocomial infections, 15 had methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the odds ratio for nosocomial infections was significantly related to gender, birth weight and the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC). When the birth weight group of more than 1, 500g was regarded as the reference, the odds ratio was 2.35 in the birth weight group of 1,000-1,499g and 8.82 in the birth weight group of less than 1,000g. The odds ratio of the CVC () for nosocomial infection was 2.27. However, other devices including artificial ventilation, umbilical artery catheter, umbilical venous catheter, and urinary catheter were not significant risk factors. The incidence of MRSA infection rapidly increased from 0.3% in the birth weight group of more than 1,500g to 2.1% in the birth weight group of 1,000-1,499g, and to 11.1% in the birth weight group of less than 1,000g. When the birth weight group of more than 1,500g was regarded as the reference, multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the odds ratio was 7.25 in the birth weight group of 1,000-1,499g and 42.88 in the birth weight group of less than 1,000g. These odds ratios were significantly higher than that in the reference group. However, the application of devices did not cause any significant differences in the odds ratio for MRSA infection.</p>
Keywords risk factors nosocomial infection neonatal intensive care unit JANIS
Amo Type Original Article
Published Date 2008-08
Publication Title Acta Medica Okayama
Volume volume62
Issue issue4
Publisher Okayama University Medical School
Start Page 261
End Page 268
ISSN 0386-300X
NCID AA00508441
Content Type Journal Article
language 英語
File Version publisher
Refereed True
PubMed ID 18766209
Web of Sience KeyUT 000258680900006