ID 60854
Author
Ishihara, Ryo Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University
Matsumura, Kentarou Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University
Jones, Jordan Elouise Department of Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour, Institute of Infection, Veterinary and Ecological Sciences, University of Liverpool
Yuhao, Ji Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University
Fujisawa, Ryusuke School of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology
Nagaya, Naohisa Faculty of Information Science and Engineering, Kyoto Sangyo University
Miyatake, Takahisa Department of Evolutionary Ecology, Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University ORCID Kaken ID publons researchmap
Abstract
Death feigning (or tonic immobility) is an effective antipredator strategy. However, prolonged immobility on the ground increases the risk of being parasitized or eaten by predators, and thus, insects must rouse themselves when appropriate stimulation is provided. Very few studies on the effect of stimulus intensity on arousal from death feigning have been conducted. A previous study using Tribolium castaneum showed an existing threshold for the intensity of the stimulus that causes arousal from death feigning. Whether there are differences between species in the threshold for arousal is an interesting question. In the present study, we, therefore, compared the effect of stimulus strength on arousal from death feigning in two closely related species, namely, T. confusum and T. freemani, which are established strains that have been artificially selected for longer duration of death feigning. Also, part of the study was to determine whether there was a positive association between intensity of stimulus needed to rouse and the duration of death feigning. We discuss why there is a difference in the strength of the stimulus needed for arousal from death feigning among Tribolium species, for which we included the data for T. castaneum from a previous study.
Keywords
Beetle
Death feigning
Selection experiment
Species comparison
Thanatosis
Tonic immobility
Tribolium
Note

This fulltext is available on Oct. 2021.
Published Date
2020-10-20
Publication Title
Journal of Ethology
Volume
volume39
Publisher
Springer
Start Page
107
End Page
113
ISSN
0289-0771
NCID
AA10754455
Content Type
Journal Article
language
英語
OAI-PMH Set
岡山大学
File Version
author
DOI
Web of Science KeyUT
Related Url
isVersionOf https://doi.org/10.1007/s10164-020-00680-0
Funder Name
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
助成番号
17H05976
18H02510